WEOBLEY

weobley

Black and white buildings seem to be everywhere you look in Weobley.  They line Broad Street, a broad street with a green running down in it, in the heart of the village. The village sign echoes the black and white theme by being the most enormous magpie.  Herefordshire is a long way from my usual stamping grounds, what took me there was a writing course.  Eight of us gathered in ‘The Throne’, one of the black and white houses which also once sheltered King Charles I, for four days of plotting and characterisation.

Weobley

Moira Please and Jane Ayres, who run THE PLACE TO WRITE, booked the fine Tudor building, in Weobley,  full of atmospheric nooks and crannies for their latest course.  Best selling author Chris Manby was our tutor, she not only writes excellent novels but has penned a really useful ‘how to’ book entitled WRITING FOR LOVE.  We spent our mornings learning the finer points of plotting and why being able to describe your magnum opus in one sentence right from the beginning helps to avoid flab in the future.  If you hanker after writing a novel then I commend The Place to Write as an excellent venue to meet like minded souls whilst learning more about the writing craft.

preaching-cross

Afternoons were left free to work on those plots or to explore the surrounding area.  I did some plotting and did pop out for a bit of fresh air.  In addition to its many fine black and white buildings, Weobley also has an ancient and beautiful church.  In the graveyard is a large cross.  I assumed that this was just a regular kind of a cross but it turns out that I was wrong.  It’s called a Preaching Cross and dates from the 14th century.  Well the steps do, the actual cross was destroyed in the Reformation or Civil War and replaced in the nineteenth century.  People have congregated around the steps and the cross for outdoor processions for centuries.

phone-box

Tucked away at the opposite end of Woebley to the church I spied this telephone box.  Despite there being no mobile phone signal in the village people have stopped using the box for making telephone calls.  The telephone equipment has been replaced by a defibrillator, a device one always hopes not to have to use but lifesaving when you do.

Leaving my boys with a fridge full of food, tagged with yellow stickies bearing full usage instructions meant that I knew they wouldn’t starve.  They are now of an age when they can be left for short periods of time.  Mr CW delayed his departure for work for as long as possible but the Junior CWs had half an hour to eat breakfast, clear up and leave.  When I arrived home the house was in perfect order.  One proud/relieved Mother.

Photalife

13 thoughts on “WEOBLEY

  1. Coombe Mill October 16, 2016 / 12:07 am

    What a lovely spot you visited and what a difference it makes when you can leave the kids home alone, we are taking full advantage now ours are older.

  2. Tim October 16, 2016 / 12:11 am

    Sounds fascinating – and an ideal location for a writing course/retreat!

    • Catherine October 16, 2016 / 10:11 am

      It was warm, cosy and inspirational

  3. Louise (Little Hearts, Big Love) October 16, 2016 / 12:14 am

    What a beautiful village – love all the black and white buildings and it looks like a very tranquil spot for focusing on writing. Glad to hear that the house was in perfect order on your return – always nice to come back to a tidy house!

    • Catherine October 16, 2016 / 10:13 am

      Calm soon shattered by the return of the juniors and a scramble to get ready to leave for a Scout camping weekend. Shoes, uniform and kit all over the place within seconds!

  4. Tara October 16, 2016 / 6:23 am

    That course sounds AMAZING! And what a venue. I think I would have been torn between writing/exploring. Well done the boys too. 🙂 #MySundayPhoto

    • Catherine October 16, 2016 / 10:14 am

      Roaring fires and a cup of tea ensured I didn’t stray away from my pencils!

  5. Notmyyearoff October 16, 2016 / 11:17 am

    I love old Tudor houses like these, they usually have so much history behind those doors. Would love to visit there one day. Is it pronounced “weebly”?

  6. Bear and Cardigan October 16, 2016 / 3:24 pm

    What a beautiful place and perfect for writing #MySundayPhoto

  7. Martyn Kitney October 16, 2016 / 6:45 pm

    I love the preaching cross! #mysundayphoto

  8. Victoria Welton October 16, 2016 / 7:48 pm

    This course sounds wonderful – and I love the location, full of inspiration.

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